September is National Preparedness Month-CDC

You Have the Power to Prepare

Throughout September, CDC and more than 3000 organizations—national, regional, and local governments, as well as private and public organizations—will support emergency preparedness efforts and encourage Americans to take action.

This year, the Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response will focus on four important topics – READY… STEADY… SHOW… GO! Each week, we will publish a Public Health Matters Blog post, social media messages, and graphics.

Week 1: READY… Build a kit. Make a plan. Be informed.

Many emergencies happen without warning, so it is important that you take steps ahead of time to keep you and your loved ones safe and healthy. One important way you can prepare is by having a kit ready in case you do not have access to food, water, or electricity for several days after a disaster. In addition to building a kit, talk to your loved ones about an emergency planwith the steps you all will take in different types of emergencies and how you will contact one another. Finally, stay informed to make sure you get the information you need when an emergency happens, especially the types of emergencies that might happen in your area.

Week 2: STEADY…Review your plans and update your kit.

Preparing does not stop after you have your kit ready and your emergency plan in place. In a real emergency, you may become overwhelmed or confused, so it is important to practice your emergency plan – review the plans and have practice drills with your whole family. Review and replace the contents of your emergency kit every six months. Be sure to check expiration dates on food, water, medicine, and batteries and add any personal items that are unique to your needs.

Week 3: SHOW… Inspire others to prepare.

Research shows that talking about preparedness increases the likelihood of others taking steps to get prepared. Talk to your family and friends about the important steps they can take to be prepared. Be a preparedness role model – volunteer in your community, take a first aid and CPR class, or share a photo of your emergency kit or a selfie of you and your family at your emergency meeting place.

Week 4: GO! Take immediate action to save lives.

It is vital that people take not only immediate but also the appropriate protective action when an emergency happens. Local officials will ask you to shelter in place (take shelter in a basement or windowless interior room) in some situations; and to evacuate your home, workplace or community in response in others. For example, a wildfire or an approaching hurricane. Know when to go (or stay), where to go, how to get there and what to do BEFORE an emergency. The most important thing is to take immediate and decisive action.

Get involved

Follow us on social media (@CDCemergency on Twitter and CDC Emergency Preparedness and Response on Facebook), bookmark our Public Health Matters blog, and sign up for GovDelivery email updates.

If you would like to partner with us for Preparedness Month, or want more information, contact us at phprcommunications@cdc.gov.

Infographic

 https://www.cdc.gov/phpr/npm/powerofpreparedness2017.htm
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